CASA grounds Tiger Airways Australia

Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) suspended the operations of low-cost carrier Tiger Airways Australia, with immediate effect from Saturday, 2 July 2011, saying the carrier posed a “serious and imminent risk to air safety”. The agency applied on 7 July to the Federal Court in Melbourne to extend the initial five-working-day suspension until 1 August. As CASA announced its intention to make the application, Tiger Airways Australia revealed that its Chief Executive Officer Crawford Rix is to leave the airline at the end of the month.

8th Jul 2011


CASA grounds Tiger Airways Australia over safety

Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) suspended the operations of low-cost carrier Tiger Airways Australia, with immediate effect from Saturday, 2 July 2011, saying the carrier posed a “serious and imminent risk to air safety”.

The agency applied on 7 July to the Federal Court in Melbourne to extend the initial five-working-day suspension until 1 August. As CASA announced its intention to make the application, Tiger Airways Australia revealed that its Chief Executive Officer Crawford Rix is to leave the airline at the end of the month.

Rix’s duties will be taken over by Tony Davis, Group President and CEO of the airline’s parent, Tiger Airways Holdings. Meanwhile, Davis’ former duties will be passed on to the parent company’s Executive Director Chin Yau Seng, although Davis will remain a director of Tiger Airways Holdings.

“Tiger Airways has been working constructively with CASA for the past five days to establish a plan for the resumption of our services and will not oppose the period of extension,” the carrier said in a statement on 6 July. “The airline remains committed to resuming services as quickly as possible.”

CASA says it requested the extension because its investigations into the airline would not be completed within the initial five-day suspension period. Operations could be allowed to resume earlier than August if the airline successfully demonstrates that it is no longer a safety risk, the agency says.

Issuing the initial suspension, CASA said: “This action has been taken because CASA believes permitting the airline to continue to fly poses a serious and imminent risk to air safety. The suspension of Tiger Airways Australia follows the issue of a show-cause notice to the airline in March 2011.”

CASA subsequently imposed a number of conditions on the airline’s air operator’s certificate (AOC), requiring the airline to: improve the proficiency of its pilots; improve pilot training and checking processes; change its fatigue-management policies; improve maintenance control and ongoing airworthiness systems; and ensure appropriately qualified people fill management and operational positions.

“CASA has been closely monitoring the operations of Tiger Airways Australia throughout 2011, with surveillance undertaken at a range of locations,” the agency says. “Since Tiger Airways Australia was served the show cause notice, there have been further events raising concerns about the airline’s ability to continue to conduct operations safely. In the circumstances, CASA no longer has confidence in the ability of Tiger Airways Australia to satisfactorily address the safety issues that have been identified.”

 

 

 

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