MAHB to raise aeronautical fees

Malaysia Airports Holdings Berhad (MAHB) will increase aeronautical fees starting with the international passenger service charge (IPSC) from 15 September. The IPSC will be increased by 14 ringgit (US$4.66) to 65 ringgit at Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA), Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah Airport in Subang, Langkawi International Airport, Penang International Airport, Kota Kinabalu International Airport and Kuching International Airport. At the Low-Cost Carriers (LCC) Terminal at KLIA and Terminal 2 Kota Kinabalu, the charge will rise by 7 ringgit to 32 ringgit.

6th Sep 2011



 MAHB to raise aeronautical fees

Malaysia Airports Holdings Berhad (MAHB) will increase aeronautical fees starting with the international passenger service charge (IPSC) from 15 September.

The IPSC will be increased by 14 ringgit (US$4.66) to 65 ringgit at Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA), Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah Airport in Subang, Langkawi International Airport, Penang International Airport, Kota Kinabalu International Airport and Kuching International Airport. At the Low-Cost Carriers (LCC) Terminal at KLIA and Terminal 2 Kota Kinabalu, the charge will rise by 7 ringgit to 32 ringgit.

The ISPC has not been changed since 2002.

Landing charges will be increased in three stages, by 9 percent each time. The first increase will come in January 2012, followed by further increases in January 2013 and January 2014. Aircraft parking charges will also be increased in three stages by 18 percent each year starting 2012.

Parking charges are based on 12-hour blocks, with the first three hours free.
MAHB points out that landing and parking charges have not been raised for the past 17 years.

Landing fees are currently waived for three years for all new routes and additional frequencies operated by airlines into Malaysia. This policy was implemented in May 2002.

 


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