Boeing delays 747-8I, 787-9 deliveries

Boeing has revealed, in a filing to the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), that first deliveries of the 747-8 Intercontinental and the 787-9 have both been delayed. The first example of the passenger version of the 747-8 will now be handed over to a VIP customer in the first quarter of 2012, instead of late this year as previously stated. Deliveries of the 787-9 to launch customer Air New Zealand will now begin in early 2014, instead of late 2013.

16th Nov 2011


 General News
 Boeing delays 747-8I, 787-9 deliveries


Boeing has revealed, in a filing to the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), that first deliveries of the 747-8 Intercontinental and the 787-9 have both been delayed.
The first example of the passenger version of the 747-8 will now be handed over to a VIP customer in the first quarter of 2012, instead of late this year as previously stated. Deliveries of the 787-9 to launch customer Air New Zealand will now begin in early 2014, instead of late 2013.
The delay to the 747-8I has been attributed to a hold-up in the test programme and the time it has taken to introduce required design changes.
“The 747-8 Intercontinental remains on track for certification in the fourth quarter,” the manufacturer says in its Form 10-Q filing, covering its third-quarter results. “First delivery is now scheduled for first quarter 2012 due to a delay in flight-testing and the time required to incorporate all flight test driven changes.”
The hold-up to the 787-9 has arisen in the wake of the aircraft’s critical design review, although Boeing says it is continuing to seek opportunities to catch up on its earlier schedule. Boeing last said in July that it would hand the first -9 over in late 2013, although the company did add that it was constantly re-examining its schedule.
“With successful completion of the 787-9 critical design review we have assessed the schedule and first delivery is now expected in early 2014, although we continue to look for opportunities to regain schedule,” Boeing says in its filing to the SEC. “In addition, we continue to work with our customers and suppliers to assess the specific impacts of prior schedule changes, including requests for contractual relief related to delivery delays and supplier assertions.”


 All Nippon completes first 787 passenger flight
All Nippon Airways (ANA), Japan’s largest airline, made aviation history on 26 October with the completion of the first ever passenger flight of the new Boeing 787 ‘Dreamliner’.
The charter flight took off just after midday local time from Tokyo’s Narita Airport, with more than 240 passengers on board. It landed four and a half hours later in Hong Kong.
ANA says scheduled domestic services using the aircraft will begin on 1 November, followed by international flights “in the following two months”, starting with flights to Beijing and Frankfurt.
ANA has ordered 55 787s and has received two to date, with a total of 20 expected to be handed over by the end of the 2012 business year. The airline says the aircraft will eventually help it save ¥10 billion (US$130 million) a year in fuel costs.
Built mainly from carbon-fibre composite material, the aircraft offers a 20 percent reduction in fuel consumption compared with current competitors. It also includes innovations such as a cabin altitude of 6,000ft instead of the 8,000ft that is standard today, as well as increased air humidity, offering passengers a more comfortable travel environment.
Japanese manufacturers supply approximately 35 percent of the aircraft’s parts, including key sections of the wings and fuselage.
The 787 entered operational service despite concern over an incident where the first aircraft suffered slight surface damage to an engine inlet cowling after hitting a passenger bridge while being towed on 13 October, just two weeks after delivery. However, the aircraft continued flight-testing the following day after checks were completed.
The second aircraft was delivered on 16 October.

[Briefs]
AIR PACIFIC, the national carrier of Fiji, has signed a firm contract to buy three new A330-200 widebody twinjets to replace its existing fleet of Boeing 747s and 767s. The new aircraft will be delivered in 2013 and will fly on trans-Pacific routes to Los Angeles and throughout the Asia-Pacific region, including Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand. “The A330 is the most versatile and fuel-efficient aircraft in its category today, and it is clearly the best aircraft for modernising our fleet, optimising our network and ensuring future growth opportunities as we position Air Pacific to be the preferred airline in the South Pacific,” says Dave Pflieger, the airline’s managing director and chief executive officer.
EMBRAER says it delivered 28 commercial aircraft and 18 executive jets in the third quarter of 2011. When the period ended on 30 September, the Brazilian manufacturer says its firm-order backlog totalled US$16 billion. In the three-month period, Embraer sold 17 E-Jets: two Embraer 190s to US lessor GECAS and another ten to Kenya Airways, along with five Embraer 195s to Germany’s Lufthansa. China Southern Airlines became the newest E-Jets operator and received the 800th aircraft delivered, leased from China’s CDB Leasing, which ordered 20 of the jets.
 

Asian Aviation at a glance