New Airbus training centre opens in Singapore

The training joint venture announced in 2014 by Singapore Airlines and Airbus officially opened its dedicated US$100 million facility on 18 April with officials there saying the centre should become the largest in the world for Airbus training.

18th Apr 2016


 

New Airbus training centre opens in Singapore

 

By Matt Driskill

 

The training joint venture announced in 2014 by Singapore Airlines and Airbus officially opened its dedicated US$100 million facility on 18 April with officials there saying the centre should become the largest in the world for Airbus training.

 

The new Airbus Asia Training Centre (AATC) is 55 percent owned by Airbus and 45 percent by Singapore Airlines (SIA) and will have eight simulators in operation by 2019 to train up to 10,000 pilots annually for all in-production Airbus planes.

 

The 9,250 square meter facility is located at Singapore’s growing Seletar Aerospace Park and join’s the other Airbus centres in Toulouse, Miami and Beijing.

 

 

 

Airbus president and chief executive officer Fabrice Brégier said at the official opening event that “the new centre combines the expertise of our two companies to offer the highest standards of training for the growing flight crew population in the Asia-Pacific region."

 

SIA chief executive Goh Choon Phong said “with hundreds more new Airbus aircraft on firm order by the region's airlines, we are confident that AATC will go from strength to strength."

 

Officials said 17 airlines from the region have signed up to train pilots there and Airbus predicts that the Asia-Pacific region will account for the majority of aircraft demand with 40 percent of all new aircraft deliveries headed to the region. The company anticipates that the 5,600 aircraft in operation today in the region will grow to 14,000 over the next 20 years.

 

Didier Lux, an Airbus senior vice president, said at the facility’s opening that the region will need to see tens of thousands of pilots trained to handle all the new aircraft. He said the region currently has an active crew population of of 65,000 and that needs to increase to at least 170,000 to meet anticipated growth.

 

Airbus and SIA were offering training at SIA’s facility near Changi airport in Singapore and all Airbus training will be moved to the new facility. The Changi facility will remain in operation for Boeing, or “the other aircraft maker,” as Airbus is fond of saying.

 

Boeing’s own figures show there will be a tremendous need for pilots in the Asia-Pacific region where at least 12 new airlines have sprouted up, many using the low-cost carrier formula.

 

Boeing’s 2015 Pilot and Technician Outlook said the region will need at least 226,000 pilots by 2034, by far the most among any region in the world. In addition to its Changi facility, which will remain in operation, Boeing also has facilities in Shanghai, two in South Korea and two in Australia.

 

 

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